Florida Holocaust Museum, St. Petersburg

4.6
#5 of 21 in Museums in St. Petersburg
History Museum · Hidden Gem · Museum
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The Florida Holocaust Museum is a Holocaust museum located at 55 Fifth Street South in St. Petersburg, Florida. Founded in 1992, it moved to its current location in 1998. Formerly known as the Holocaust Center, the museum officially changed to its current name in 1999. It is one of the largest Holocaust museums in the United States. It was founded by Walter and Edith Lobenberg both of whom were German Jews who escaped persecution in Nazi Germany by immigrating to the United States. Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel served as Honorary Chairman and cut the ribbon at the 1998 opening ceremony. The Florida Holocaust Museum is one of three Holocaust Museums that are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The museum works with the local community and survivors of the Holocaust to spread awareness and to educate the public on the history of the Holocaust.

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Florida Holocaust Museum reviews

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TripAdvisor traveler rating
TripAdvisor traveler rating 4.5
592 reviews
Google
4.7
TripAdvisor
  • We visited the Florida Holocaust Museum as part of our western Florida exploration tour. Being from Israel, with my wife being a "Second Generation Holocaust Survivor", we decided to visit this... 
    We visited the Florida Holocaust Museum as part of our western Florida exploration tour. Being from Israel, with my wife being a "Second Generation Holocaust Survivor", we decided to visit this...  more »
  • I learned a lot. I'm happy it's here for people to see and understand. I hope the museum stay here for years to come so more people will be educated and have better understanding of what the Jews... 
    I learned a lot. I'm happy it's here for people to see and understand. I hope the museum stay here for years to come so more people will be educated and have better understanding of what the Jews...  more »
Google
  • Very informative with lists of artifacts including a box car. Staff was very pleasant. I was surprised to see a remembrance/prayer room at the end where you could reflect on your thoughts and feelings. Upstairs was an art gallery as well as an interactive Q&A with survivors that was previously taped. Gift shop was smaller, but seemed to have something for everyone.
  • This was a nicely curated museum offering lots of information, interesting artifacts, as well as art to shape your experience. It's a smaller museum, so I would say you could spend about an hour, maybe 2 tops, here if you read through each exhibit. The railroad car is really a haunting sight to see in the best way possible; it's such a strong and important presence, and is an incredible piece of history for this museum to have. There is a little prayer room that mimics the appearance of the Western Wall in Jerusalem, allowing you to even write down a message or a prayer and place it in the cracks of the tiles. They also offer an interactive digital experience where you can ask questions to a holocaust survivor who's testimony is pre-recorded, and some type of software essentially connects your question to a point in the survivor's story. I didn't personally do it, I was by myself and I felt a little awkward engaging in it with other people around, but I was interested to try it. Overall, this was a great museum and is definitely an important epicenter for holocaust remembrance.

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