14 days in Catalonia Itinerary

14 days in Catalonia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Catalonia holiday planner
Make it your trip
1
Barcelona
— 3 nights
Drive
2
Llanca
— 3 nights
Drive
3
Calella de Palafrugell
— 3 nights
Drive
4
Salou
— 4 nights
Drive

S M T W T F S
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31
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Barcelona — 3 nights

Barcelona, the country’s second-largest city, is a cosmopolitan urban center known for its throbbing youthful energy and stellar architecture.
Do your shopping at La Boqueria and Casa Gispert. Attractions like Basilica de la Sagrada Familia and Ciutat Vella make great kid-friendly stops. You'll find plenty of places to visit near Barcelona: Colonia Guell Gaudi Crypt (in Santa Coloma de Cervello) and Beach Castelldelfels Barcelona (in Castelldefels). And it doesn't end there: take a stroll through Las Ramblas, take a leisurely stroll along Port Vell, get to know the fascinating history of Barri de Gracia, and stop by El Barri Gòtic.

For other places to visit and other tourist information, read our Barcelona trip itinerary maker app.

If you are flying in from Denmark, the closest major aiports are Barcelona International Airport, Girona Airport and Reus Air Base. In July, plan for daily highs up to 34°C, and evening lows to 25°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 26th (Tue) early enough to travel to Llanca.
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Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Outdoors · Parks
Side Trips

Llanca — 3 nights

Explore hidden gems such as Cap de Creus National Park and SK Kayak. Family-friendly places like Ruins of Empuries and Monasterio de Sant Pere de Rodes will thrill your kids. Step out of Llanca to go to Cadaques and see Salvador Dali House, which is approximately 34 minutes away.

To find other places to visit, more things to do, ratings, and tourist information, use the Llanca trip website.

You can drive from Barcelona to Llanca in 2 hours. Alternatively, you can drive. In July in Llanca, expect temperatures between 34°C during the day and 22°C at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 29th (Fri) early enough to travel to Calella de Palafrugell.
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Nature · Parks · Historic Sites · Museums
Side Trips

Calella de Palafrugell — 3 nights

Discover out-of-the-way places like Playas de Calella and La Fosca Beach. Get in touch with nature at Platja Fonda and Aigua Xelida.

To see where to stay, reviews, maps, and more tourist information, read our Calella de Palafrugell day trip planning website.

You can drive from Llanca to Calella de Palafrugell in 1.5 hours. In July in Calella de Palafrugell, expect temperatures between 35°C during the day and 20°C at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 1st (Mon) to allow enough time to travel to Salou.
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Outdoors · Beaches · Parks · Tours
Side Trips

Salou — 4 nights

Known for its Mediterranean climate and vibrant beach community, Salou serves as the tourist capital of the Costa Dorada.
Take a break from the city and head to Capellans Beach and Cala Crancs. Muralla romana de Tarragona and Itinere - Day Tours will appeal to history buffs. You'll find plenty of places to visit near Salou: Playa de Calafell (in Segur de Calafell), Far Torredembarra (in Torredembarra) and Ciudadela Iberica de Calafell (in Calafell). There's still lots to do: ponder the design of Illuminated Fountain, kick back and relax at Cala Font, and stroll through Llenguadets Beach.

To see ratings, other places to visit, and other tourist information, use the Salou day trip planning site.

You can drive from Calella de Palafrugell to Salou in 2.5 hours. Another option is to drive. In August, plan for daily highs up to 34°C, and evening lows to 24°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 5th (Fri) early enough to drive back home.
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Beaches · Parks · Outdoors · Historic Sites
Side Trips

Catalonia travel guide

4.2
Architectural Buildings · Parks · Nightlife
Proud of its distinct culture and heritage, Catalonia is an autonomous region within Spain. The fierce spirit of this region and its inhabitants has shaped the history of Spain and, often, the rest of Europe. Its diverse land is home to the metropolis of Barcelona and numerous smaller urban centers, villages, and resorts, many of which are packed with sightseeing possibilities and tourists all year long. Despite seemingly unstoppable commercialization and urbanization, much of Catalonia has managed to retain the wild, unblemished beauty that drew visitors to Spain in the first place. Its main geographical feature is the mighty Pyrenees range, dominating a landscape of green valleys dotted with sleepy rural communities, ancient monasteries, and working vineyards ideal for day trips.
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