Nyatapola Temple, Bhaktapur

4.7
#3 of 27 in Things to do in Bhaktapur
Religious Site · Tourist Spot
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Admire the incredible architecture of Nyatapola Temple, the temple of the Hindu goddess of prosperity. Built in 1702 during the reign of Bhupatindra Malla, the five-story temple displays the best of local art, culture, and religion. To reach the temple you need to use a stairway, where you can see stone figures of the temple's guardians, as well as eight lucky Buddhist signs carved besides the doors. Although you cannot enter the temple, which is reserved exclusively for priests, you can take some amazing photos from outside. Locals will tell you that this temple has survived several strong earthquakes, while some smaller temples in the area were completely destroyed. Plan trip to Bhaktapur with our itinerary maker to find out where to go and what to do.
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Nyatapola Temple reviews

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  • I can see why tavelers enjoyed to take pictures on this temple. It is massive and very impressive. Climb to the top of the stairs and enjoy the break taking view of the place. 
    I can see why tavelers enjoyed to take pictures on this temple. It is massive and very impressive. Climb to the top of the stairs and enjoy the break taking view of the place.  more »
  • what a charming place and its one of the fine impressive temple in the bhaktapur. climbing up and taking pic of each carving so nice 
    what a charming place and its one of the fine impressive temple in the bhaktapur. climbing up and taking pic of each carving so nice  more »
Google
  • One of the greatest historical temple. Nyātāpola Temple (Nepal Bhasa: 𑐒𑐵𑐟𑐵𑐥𑑀𑐮‎, "ṅātāpola", lit. 'something with five storey') is a five tiered temple located in the central part of Bhaktapur, Nepal. It is the tallest monument within the city and is also the tallest temple of Nepal. This temple was commissioned by King Bhupatindra Malla, the construction of which lasted for six months from 31 December 1701 to 15 July 1702. The temple has survived four major earthquakes and it's aftershocks including the recent 7.8 magnitude April 2015 earthquake which entirely destroyed the city of Bhaktapur. Along with the Bhairava temple and other historical monuments, the Nyatapola forms the Tamārhi square, the most important area of Bhaktapur and a popular tourist destination. The Nyatapola temple holds a great important in the culture and folklore of Bhaktapur. It's silhouette is used by the municipality as well most of the corporations of the city. Reaching to a height of 33 m (108.26 ft), the Nyatapola temple dominates the skyline of Bhaktapur and is the tallest monument there. The temple is of a great cultural importance to the people of Bhaktapur as numerous folklore of the city is based on the monument. The Nyatapola Square also divides the town of Bhaktapur into two parts: Thané (lit. 'Upper one') and Konhé (lit. 'Lower one'). The gates of the temple is only opened once a year in July on the anniversary of its establishment during which the Avāla subgroup of the Newars plant a triangular flag on its top and the Karmacharya priests perform a ritual on the deity. Since the public is not allowed in, the deity housed inside is also not known to the public although it is generally accepted that the temple houses a powerful Tantric incarnation of the mother goddess. Even the contemporary manuscript dealing with the construction of the temple does not mention the name of the deity housed inside. The words 𑐒𑐵𑐟𑐵𑐥𑑀𑐮𑐮𑐡𑐾𑐰𑐮‎, ṅātāpolaladevala (where devala means temple in Classical Newar) written in the ledger of its construction. Nyatapola is regarded as unique in terms of its name as it one of the only few temples which is not named after the deity residing inside it. It's name is derived from the local Nepal Bhasa name "ṅātāpola", where "ṅātā" means something with five storey while "pola" means roof in the Bhaktapur dialect of Nepal Bhasa . Newar people outside of Bhaktapur use the term "Nyātāpau", where "nyātā" has the same meaning as "ṅātā" and "pau" has same meaning as "pola". The name "𑐒𑐵𑐟𑐵𑐥𑑀𑐮‎ (ṅātāpola)" has been in use since it's construction as the temple was referred as such in the ledger of its construction work. Historian Purushottam Lochan Shrestha found an inscription being used as a stair stone by soldiers housed in Bhaktapur Durbar Square. The inscription, which was heavily damaged by the act and only three words and a date survived talks about the inauguration of the temple on 15 July 1702 and uses the word "𑐒𑐵𑐟𑐵𑐥𑑀𑐮‎ (ŋ̊ātāpola)" to refer to the temple. Raj Man Singh Chitrakar who drew a sketch of the Nyatapola temple in 1844 AD has inscribed this temple as "Gniato Polo temple of Devi". Similarly, Henry Ambrose Oldfield who painted this temple in 1854 AD has inscribed this temple as "Temple of Devi Bhagwati at Bhatgaon". Loved it.
  • Beautiful ancient and historic place. Bhakatapur is rich in art, culture, monuments, foods etc. We can visit with friends and family and enjoy. The place is clean although it is crowned in holidays.

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