4 days in Grampians Itinerary

4 days in Grampians Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Grampians planner

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Plan created by another user. Make it yours
Drive
1
Halls Gap
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Moonambel
— 1 night
Drive

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2
nights
Halls Gap

Halls Gap serves as a home base for visiting Grampians National Park.
Discover out-of-the-way places like Pomonal Estate and Grampians Estate. Get out of town with these interesting Halls Gap side-trips: Dunkeld (Mt Sturgeon, The Picaninny (Bainggug), &more) and Grampians Estate Cellar Door (in Great Western). The adventure continues: admire the sheer force of Fish Falls, indulge in some personalized pampering at Didjun Skin & Body, hike along Chatauqua Peak, and don't miss a visit to Stawell Gift Hall of Fame.

To see maps, where to stay, photos, and other tourist information, use the Halls Gap tour planning site.

Melbourne to Halls Gap is an approximately 3-hour car ride. You can also do a combination of train and bus; or take a bus. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 26th (Sat) early enough to drive to Moonambel.

Things to do in Halls Gap

Parks · Nature · Wineries · Outdoors

Side Trips

1
night
Moonambel

Kick off your visit on the 27th (Sun): do a tasting at Summerfield Cellar Door, do a tasting at Grape Farm Winery, then learn about winemaking at Dalwhinnie Wines, and finally learn about winemaking at EQUUS @ Moonambel.

To find ratings, traveler tips, where to stay, and other tourist information, refer to the Moonambel trip itinerary website.

Getting from Halls Gap to Moonambel by car takes about 1.5 hours. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 27th (Sun) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Moonambel

Wineries

Grampians travel guide

4.4
Hiking Trails · Zoos · Lookouts
Also known as Gariwerd, the Grampians National Park made it on the Australian National Heritage List for its stunning indigenous rock art and majestic natural wonders. Apart from the rock art, the area is relatively untouched. Go to see the vast array of wildflowers. This is the home of the "Grampian Wave." This isn't a wave that needs water: It's a wind wave. This strange phenomenon happens when westerly winds hit the ridge at a right angle and push paragliders as high as 8,500 m (28,000 ft). In 2006, bushfires destroyed almost half the park, but only a few months after nature began to regenerate and visitors returned in full force.