4 days in County Clare Itinerary

4 days in County Clare Itinerary

Created using Inspirock County Clare route planner

©
Make it your trip
Drive
1
Kilkee
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Ballyvaughan
— 1 night
Drive

S M T W T F S
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Kilkee

— 2 nights
Kilkee is a small coastal town in County Clare, Ireland. Discover out-of-the-way places like Bridges of Ross and Doughmore Bay. Escape the urban bustle at Scattery Island and Dolphinwatch. And it doesn't end there: don't miss a visit to The Pollock Holes, admire the natural beauty at Vandeleur Walled Garden, visit a coastal fixture at Kilbaha Lighthouse, and tour the pleasant surroundings at Shannon Dolphin and Wildlife Centre.

To find traveler tips, ratings, maps, and more tourist information, refer to the Kilkee route site.

Dublin to Kilkee is an approximately 3.5-hour car ride. In August in Kilkee, expect temperatures between 21°C during the day and 14°C at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Mon) early enough to drive to Ballyvaughan.

Things to do in Kilkee

Parks · Outdoors · Wildlife · Nature

Side Trips

Ballyvaughan

— 1 night
Nestled between the coast of Galway Bay and the hills of the Burren, the small, scenic harbor village of Ballyvaughan serves as a hub for exploring the region.
On the 25th (Tue), get outside with Backwest Adventures, then Head underground at Aillwee Cave, then stroll through Burren Birds of Prey Centre, and finally stroll through Fanore Beach.

For maps, more things to do, other places to visit, and more tourist information, use the Ballyvaughan tour itinerary maker website.

Traveling by car from Kilkee to Ballyvaughan takes 1.5 hours. In August, daily temperatures in Ballyvaughan can reach 21°C, while at night they dip to 14°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 25th (Tue) early enough to drive back home.

Things to do in Ballyvaughan

Parks · Outdoors · Wildlife · Beaches

Side Trip

County Clare travel guide

4.2
Lookouts · Castles · Caves
Banner County
Situated just below County Galway on Ireland's west coast, County Clare serves as an amalgamation of stunning and unusual landscapes. Known for some of the most-visited sites in Ireland, County Clare draws visitors with its dramatic Cliffs of Moher and the Burren. Formed by the pounding waves of the Atlantic below, the sheer cliffs bring together green earth, sheer drop-offs and blue sea. Meaning "a rocky place," the Burren landscape provides a stark contrast to the traditional green hills of Ireland, appearing as a moonscape of rocky crags and slabs. Beyond the natural splendor, the warmth of the residents in the county's small villages is a gem in its own right. Traditional Irish music and culture permeates this land and its people.