2 days in Cotswolds & Cardiff Itinerary

2 days in Cotswolds & Cardiff Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United Kingdom visit planner

Plan created by another user. Make it yours
Drive
1
Gloucester
— 1 day
Drive
2
Cardiff
— 1 night
Train

S M T W T F S
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

1
day
Gloucester

Start off your visit on the 23rd (Thu): steep yourself in history at Ashleworth Tithe Barn, then steep yourself in history at Tewkesbury Abbey, and then get to know the fascinating history of Gloucester Docks.

To find photos, other places to visit, reviews, and more tourist information, refer to the Gloucester trip itinerary builder website.

London to Gloucester is an approximately 2-hour car ride. You can also take a train; or take a bus. In July, daytime highs in Gloucester are 26°C, while nighttime lows are 18°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 23rd (Thu) early enough to go by car to Cardiff.

Things to do in Gloucester

Historic Sites

Side Trip

1
night
Cardiff

City of Castles

The capital of Wales, Cardiff is a very green city indeed, boasting more green space per person than any other place in the country.
Start off your visit on the 24th (Fri): explore the activities along Cosmeston Lakes Country Park, then explore the different monuments and memorials at Llandaff Cathedral, and then get engrossed in the history at The Royal Mint Experience.

Plan my Cardiff trip by asking Inpirock to come up with tips and suggestions.

Traveling by car from Gloucester to Cardiff takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In July, daytime highs in Cardiff are 24°C, while nighttime lows are 15°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 24th (Fri) to allow enough time to take a train back home.

Things to do in Cardiff

Museums · Wildlife · Nature · Parks

Side Trips

Cotswolds travel guide

4.4
Gardens · Architectural Buildings · Specialty Museums
Lush rolling hills and picture-perfect villages make Cotswolds one of the most popular leisure spots for locals and passing visitors alike. During the height of the season, the area gets packed with tourists exploring the region’s numerous stately homes, thatched cottages, historic churches, and attractive stone-built villages. The wood trade brought wealth and prosperity to this area centuries ago, and the region still proudly boasts hundreds of notable buildings constructed during the Middle Ages. Within easy striking distance of London and several other urban centers, this wealthy area supports a thriving artisan scene, as well as a strong food culture centered around farmer's markets and numerous organic producers.