12 days in Spitsbergen Itinerary

12 days in Spitsbergen Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Spitsbergen trip planner

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Longyearbyen
— 11 nights
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Longyearbyen

— 11 nights
A coal-mining town, Longyearbyen draws visitors interested in viewing the northern lights.
Longyearbyen is known for museums, wildlife, and historic sites. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: identify plant and animal life at Wildlife Areas, explore the activities along Magdalenefjord Svalbard, take in the architecture and atmosphere at Svalbard Kirke, and examine the collection at North Pole Expedition Museum.

For traveler tips, reviews, ratings, and tourist information, go to the Longyearbyen trip itinerary website.

Leeds, UK to Longyearbyen is an approximately 12.5-hour flight. You'll lose 1 hour traveling from Leeds to Longyearbyen due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Leeds in May, expect nights in Longyearbyen to be little chillier, around -4°C, while days are colder, around 0°C. You will have some time to spend on the 28th (Fri) before leaving for home.

Things to do in Longyearbyen

Outdoors · Tours · Historic Sites · Wildlife

Side Trip

Spitsbergen travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Safaris · Nature & Wildlife Tours
Spitsbergen is the largest and only permanently populated island of the Svalbard archipelago in northern Norway. Constituting the westernmost bulk of the archipelago, it borders the Arctic Ocean, the Norwegian Sea, and the Greenland Sea. Spitsbergen covers an area of 37673km2, making it the largest island in Norway and the 36th-largest in the world. The administrative centre is Longyearbyen. Other settlements, in addition to research outposts, are the Russian mining community of Barentsburg, the research community of Ny-Ålesund, and the mining outpost of Sveagruva. Spitsbergen was covered in 21977km2 of ice in 1999, which was approximately 58.5% of the island's total area.The island was first used as a whaling base in the 17th and 18th centuries, after which it was abandoned. Coal mining started at the end of the 19th century and several permanent communities were established. The Svalbard Treaty of 1920 recognized Norwegian sovereignty and established Svalbard as a free economic zone and a demilitarized zone.

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