11 days in Ireland Itinerary

11 days in Ireland Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Europe travel route planner

Make it your trip
1
Dublin
— 4 nights
Drive
2
Abbeyleix
— 1 night
Drive
3
Doolin
— 2 nights
Drive
4
Galway
— 3 nights
Drive

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Dublin

— 4 nights

Fair City

A history spanning over a thousand years, vibrant nightlife, and a mix of Georgian and modern architecture make Dublin a popular European tourist destination.
Dublin is known for museums, nightlife, and parks. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: wander the streets of Temple Bar, stroll around St Stephens Green, sample the fine beverages at Jameson Distillery Bow St., and see the interesting displays at Guinness Storehouse.

To find photos, ratings, more things to do, and tourist information, you can read our Dublin trip planner.

Use the Route module to find suitable travel options from your home destination to Dublin. November in Dublin sees daily highs of 11°C and lows of 3°C at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Tue) early enough to travel to Abbeyleix.

Things to do in Dublin

Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Neighborhoods
Find places to stay Nov 20 — 24:

Abbeyleix

— 1 night
Abbeyleix is a town in County Laois, Ireland, located around 14km south of the county town of Portlaoise.Abbeyleix was formerly located on the N8, the main road from Dublin to Cork, and thus provided a bottleneck, with up to 15,000 vehicles passing along the town's main street every day. Kick off your visit on the 25th (Wed): see the interesting displays at Mountmellick Museum, then stop by Nook & Cranny, and then admire the natural beauty at Heywood Gardens.

To see maps, ratings, where to stay, and tourist information, refer to the Abbeyleix visit planner.

Drive from Dublin to Abbeyleix in 1.5 hours. In November, daily temperatures in Abbeyleix can reach 11°C, while at night they dip to 3°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 25th (Wed) so you can travel to Doolin.

Things to do in Abbeyleix

Parks · Museums · Shopping

Side Trips

Doolin

— 2 nights
A world-famous center of traditional Irish music, Doolin occupies a dramatic location on Ireland's windblown Atlantic coast.
Kick off your visit on the 26th (Thu): get great views at Cliffs of Moher, then get the lay of the land with Doolin Cliff Walk, then stroll through Clare Coastal Walk Project, and finally explore the fascinating underground world of Doolin Cave. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 27th (Fri): step into the grandiose world of Bunratty Castle & Folk Park, tee off at Dromoland Castle, and then examine the collection at Clare Heritage and Genealogical Centre.

To see more things to do, ratings, traveler tips, and more tourist information, read our Doolin vacation planner.

You can drive from Abbeyleix to Doolin in 2.5 hours. In November, plan for daily highs up to 12°C, and evening lows to 5°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 27th (Fri) early enough to drive to Galway.

Things to do in Doolin

Historic Sites · Parks · Outdoors · Nature

Side Trips

Find places to stay Nov 25 — 27:

Galway

— 3 nights

City of the Tribes

A major hub for visitors exploring Ireland's western regions, Galway serves as a city of art and culture, renowned for its vibrant lifestyle and numerous festivals.
Change things up with these side-trips from Galway: Cong (The Quiet Man Museum, Ireland's School of Falconry, &more). There's lots more to do: explore the striking landscape of Connemara National Park & Visitor Centre, make a trip to Quay Street, contemplate the long history of Tyrone House, and cruise along Wild Atlantic Way.

For reviews, where to stay, ratings, and tourist information, you can read our Galway itinerary website.

Traveling by car from Doolin to Galway takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In November, plan for daily highs up to 9°C, and evening lows to 3°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 30th (Mon) early enough to drive back home.

Things to do in Galway

Parks · Nature · Outdoors · Scenic Drive

Side Trips

Find places to stay Nov 27 — 30:

Ireland travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Nightlife · Castles
Emerald Isle
Gentle green hills, Guinness, leprechauns, and friendly folks characterize this small isle of a country. From the busy big city of Dublin to cozy countryside, the emerald isle harbors a varied natural landscape and is steeped in tradition. Visitors can immerse themselves in the native Irish language by visiting a Gaeltacht, or Irish-speaking region of the country, where traditional culture thrives. The Irish are known for being open and welcoming: from the moment you land to the moment you leave, you'll be greeted with "cead mile failte"--a hundred thousand welcomes.

County Laois travel guide

4.2
Geologic Formations · Gardens · Bars & Clubs
County Laois is a county in Ireland. It is located in the south of the Midlands Region and is also located in the province of Leinster, and was formerly known as Queen's County. The modern county takes its name from Loígis, a medieval kingdom.Laois County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county is 80,559, according to the 2011 census - 20% higher than it was in the 2006 census, which is the highest percentage of population growth in the country.HistoryPrehistoricThe first people in Laois were bands of hunters and gatherers who passed through the county about 8,500 years ago. They hunted in the forests that covered Laois and fished in its rivers, gathering nuts and berries to supplement their diets.Next came Ireland’s first farmers. These people of the Neolithic period (4000 to 2500 BC) cleared forests and planted crops. Their burial mounds remain in Clonaslee and Cuffsborough.Starting around 2500 BC, the people of the Bronze Age lived in Laois. They produced weapons, tools and golden objects. Visitors to the county can see a stone circle they left behind at Monamonry, as well as the remains of their hill forts at Clopook and Monelly. Skirk, near Borris-in-Ossory, has a Bronze Age standing stone and ring fort. The body of Cashel Man indicates that ritual killing took place around 2000 BC.The next stage is known as the pre-Christian Celtic Iron Age. For the first time iron appeared in Ireland, as factions fought bloody battles for control of the land. At Ballydavis, archaeologists have discovered ring barrows that date from this time period.

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