Mellifont Abbey, Drogheda

4.5
#2 of 7 in Historic Sites in Drogheda
Religious Site · Hidden Gem · Tourist Spot
Mellifont Abbey (Irish: An Mhainistir Mhór, literally 'the Big Monastery'), was a Cistercian abbey located close to Drogheda in County Louth, Ireland. It was the first abbey of the order to be built in Ireland. In 1152, it hosted the Synod of Kells-Mellifont. After its dissolution in 1539 the abbey became a private manor house. This saw the signing of the Treaty of Mellifont in 1603 and served as William of Orange's headquarters in 1690 during the Battle of the Boyne.

Today, the ruined abbey is a National monument of Ireland and accessible to the public. The English language name for the monastery, 'Mellifont', comes from the Latin phrase Melli-fons, meaning 'Font of Honey'.
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Mellifont Abbey reviews

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TripAdvisor traveler rating 4.5
231 reviews
Google
4.5
TripAdvisor
  • What a special and historic place! One of the benefits of these times is that we almost had it to ourselves and could really soak up its very special atmosphere. The OPW have done a great job...  more »
  • This wonderful monastic site with extensive and interesting ruins is perfect for a self-guided tour given the high quality of the sign-boards. Hearing the chant emmanating from the ruins was quite a....  more »
Google
  • Very special place with a very spiritual aura. We loved our visit. Thank you.
  • Cool place to check out but won't be spending much time there.

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